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Lapis Lazuli Display
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli Stone
Lapis Lazuli Stone
A grade Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli stone
Lapis Lazuli Stone
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli
Lapis Lazuli

Lapis Lazuli Display Stone

Regular price
$20.00
Sale price
$20.00
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Measurements are in centimeters.

 

Colour:                        Blue

Luster:                         Vitreous

Crystal System:          Cubic crystal system

Chemical Formula:     (Na,Ca)₈Al₆Si₆O₂₄ (S,SO)₄

Lazurite, the main constituent, mottled with white calcite and brassy pyrite.

Hardness (Mohs):       5-5.5

Specific Gravity:         2.7-2.9

Refractive Index:        1.5

Origin of this Lapis:    Badakhshan Province of Afghanistan. 

Lapis lazuli or lapis for short, is a deep blue metamorphic rock used as a semi-precious stone that has been prized since antiquity for its intense colour.  As early as the 7th millennium BC, lapis lazuli was mined in the Sar-i Sang mines, in Shortugai, and in other mines in Badakhshan province in northeast Afghanistan.  Lapis was highly valued by the Indus Valley Civilisation (3300–1900 BC).  Lapis beads have been found at Neolithic burials in Mehrgarh, the Caucasus, and even as far from Afghanistan as Mauritania.  It was used in the funeral mask of Tutankhamun (1341–1323 BC).

At the end of the Middle Ages, lapis lazuli began to be exported to Europe, where it was ground into powder and made into ultramarine, the finest and most expensive of all blue pigments.  It was used by some of the most important artists of the Renaissance and Baroque, including MasaccioPeruginoTitian and Vermeer, and was often reserved for the clothing of the central figures of their paintings, especially the Virgin Mary.

Today, mines in northeast Afghanistan are still the major source of lapis lazuli.  Important amounts are also produced from mines west of Lake Baikal in Russia, and in the Andes mountains in Chile.  Smaller quantities are mined in Italy, Mongolia, the United States, and Canada. 

In the ancient world

Lapis lazuli has been mined in Afghanistan and exported to the Mediterranean world and South Asia since the Neolithic age.  Lapis lazuli beads have been found at Mehrgarh, a neolithic site near Quetta in Pakistan, on the ancient trade route between Afghanistan and the Indus Valley, dating to the 7th millennium BC.  Quantities of these beads have also been found at 4th millennium BC settlements in Northern Mesopotamia, and at the Bronze Age site of Shahr-e Sukhteh in southeast Iran (3rd millennium BC).  A dagger with a lapis handle, a bowl inlaid with lapis, and amulets, beads, and inlays representing eyebrows and beards, were found in the Royal Tombs of the Sumerian city-state of Ur from the 3rd Millennium BC.

Lapis was also used in ancient Mesopotamia by the AkkadiansAssyrians, and Babylonians for seals and jewellery.  In the Mesopotamian poem the Epic of Gilgamesh (17th-18th Century BC), one of the oldest known works of literature, lapis lazuli is mentioned several times.  The Statue of Ebih-Il, a 3rd millennium BC statue found in the ancient city-state of Mari in modern-day Syria, now in the Louvre, uses lapis lazuli inlays for the irises of the eyes.

In ancient Egypt, lapis lazuli was a favourite stone for amulets and ornaments such as scarabs.  Lapis jewellery has been found at excavations of the Predynastic Egyptian site Naqada (3300–3100 BC).  At Karnak, the relief carvings of Thutmose III (1479-1429 BC) show fragments and barrel-shaped pieces of lapis lazuli being delivered to him as tribute.  Powdered lapis was used as eyeshadow by Cleopatra.

Jewellery made of lapis lazuli has also been found at Mycenae attesting to relations between the Myceneans and the developed civilizations of Egypt and the East.

In late classical times and as late as the Middle Ages, lapis lazuli was often called sapphire(sapphirus in Latin, sappir in Hebrew), though it had little to do with the stone today known as the blue corundum variety sapphire.  In his book on stones, the Greek scientist Theophrastus described "the sapphirus, which is speckled with gold," a description which matches lapis lazuli.

There are many references to sapphires in the Old Testament, but most scholars agree that, since sapphire was not known before the Roman Empire, they most likely are references to lapis lazuli.  For instance, Exodus 24:10: "As they saw the God of Israel, and there was under his feet as it were a paved work of a sapphire stone." (KJV).  The term used in the Latin Vulgate Bible in this citation is "lapidus sapphiri," the term for lapis lazuli.   Modern translations of the Bible, such as the New Living Translation Second Edition, refer to lapis lazuli in most instances instead of sapphire.